Derrick

(Source: dandancantfly)

dandancantfly:

A selection of behind the scene shots from The Dark Knight Rises [2]

andrewandthegarfields:

House of Cards || American Cinematographer - February, 2013

(Source: larsulric-h)

rlwasteland:

The Malick-Lubezki “Dogma”
When Terrence Malick and cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki began planning The New World, they sketched out a set of rules that, over time, evolved into what the crew called “the dogma.”
Although there is no written version of the Malick-Lubezki dogma on The Tree of Life, interviews with the cinematographer and some key collaborators suggest some parameters:
Shoot in available natural light
Do not underexpose the negative. Keep true blacks
Preserve the latitude in the image
Seek maximum resolution and fine grain
Seek depth with deep focus and stop: “Compose in depth”
Shoot in backlight for continuity and depth
Use negative fill to avoid “light sandwiches” (even sources on both sides)
Shot in crosslight only after dawn or before dusk; never front light
Avoid lens flares
Avoid white and primary colors in frame
Shoot with short-focal-length, hard lenses
No filters except Polarizer
Shoot with steady handheld or Steadicam “in the eye of the hurricane”
Z-axis moves instead of pans or tilts
No zooming
Do some static tripod shots “in midst of our haste”
Accept the exception to the dogma (“Article E”)
With a laugh, Lubezki notes, “Our dogma is full of contradictions! For example, if you use backlight, you will get flares, or if you go for a deep stop, you will have more grain because you need a faster stock. So you have to make these decisions on the spot: what is better in this case, grain or depth?”
“The most important rule for me is to not underexpose,” he continues. “We want the blacks; we don’t like milky images. Article E does not apply to underexposure!” The cinematographer concedes that there is a single underexposed shot in Tree, an amazing accomplishment for a film shot in such free form.
Lubezki appreciates the “complexity” of natural light. “When you put someone in front of a window, you’re getting the reflection from the blue sky and the clouds and the sun bouncing on the grass and in the room. You’re getting all these colors and a different quality of light. It’s very hard to go back to artificial light in the same movie. It’s like you’re setting a tone, and artificial light feels weird and awkward [after that].”
…
Source:
American Cinematographer: “Cosmic Questions”
American Cinematographer: “Big Bang Theory”

rlwasteland:

The Malick-Lubezki “Dogma”

When Terrence Malick and cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki began planning The New World, they sketched out a set of rules that, over time, evolved into what the crew called “the dogma.”

Although there is no written version of the Malick-Lubezki dogma on The Tree of Life, interviews with the cinematographer and some key collaborators suggest some parameters:

  • Shoot in available natural light
  • Do not underexpose the negative. Keep true blacks
  • Preserve the latitude in the image
  • Seek maximum resolution and fine grain
  • Seek depth with deep focus and stop: “Compose in depth”
  • Shoot in backlight for continuity and depth
  • Use negative fill to avoid “light sandwiches” (even sources on both sides)
  • Shot in crosslight only after dawn or before dusk; never front light
  • Avoid lens flares
  • Avoid white and primary colors in frame
  • Shoot with short-focal-length, hard lenses
  • No filters except Polarizer
  • Shoot with steady handheld or Steadicam “in the eye of the hurricane”
  • Z-axis moves instead of pans or tilts
  • No zooming
  • Do some static tripod shots “in midst of our haste”
  • Accept the exception to the dogma (“Article E”)

With a laugh, Lubezki notes, “Our dogma is full of contradictions! For example, if you use backlight, you will get flares, or if you go for a deep stop, you will have more grain because you need a faster stock. So you have to make these decisions on the spot: what is better in this case, grain or depth?”

“The most important rule for me is to not underexpose,” he continues. “We want the blacks; we don’t like milky images. Article E does not apply to underexposure!” The cinematographer concedes that there is a single underexposed shot in Tree, an amazing accomplishment for a film shot in such free form.

Lubezki appreciates the “complexity” of natural light. “When you put someone in front of a window, you’re getting the reflection from the blue sky and the clouds and the sun bouncing on the grass and in the room. You’re getting all these colors and a different quality of light. It’s very hard to go back to artificial light in the same movie. It’s like you’re setting a tone, and artificial light feels weird and awkward [after that].”

Source:

American Cinematographer: “Cosmic Questions”

American Cinematographer: “Big Bang Theory”

(via sherwynspencer-deactivated20140)